Jamalyn (jamalyn) wrote,
Jamalyn
jamalyn

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Book Quiz

Figurines that fall like leaves the disappear, keep calling
Is it real? Is it real?
Dark machines that wheeze and breathe then mock the air, appalling
What is real? What is real?
This world can really be too much
I can't take another day
I guess that I've just had enough
My minds slipping far away
I'm falling out of touch
Could someone please explain?

Set my mind for open sky, but couldn't fly, so sadly
What am I? What am I?
Sullen eyes shed teardrop lies then criticize, now laughing
What is real? What is real?
It's really all become too much
I'm not sure what I should feel
I guess I've finally had enough
I don't know if this is real
I'm crashing in and out of touch
Can anyone please explain?

~Is It Real? (Cowboy Bebop)


I’ve been reading too many books with insane characters as of late. I can feel them curling deep into my brain, and that is never a good thing. :)

But I have the book reviews as promised. Short and sweet, as implied.


Catch-22:
My favorite. If you never read another so-called classic, blah, blah, blah. Its been a very long time (if ever) since I’ve read a book that in less than a page can take me from howling with laughter to a short-of-breath no, please no. I especially liked the way it was written; the way the story kept chasing its own tail, going around and around and around, picking up snippets of detail with each increasingly concentric pass (not unlike a WWII bomber circling its target). It allows each character to evolve similar to a real acquaintance, their personalities thickening, becoming more or less favorable respectively as you come to know them as their true selves.


The Bell Jar:
Hmm. Not my favorite, but decent. I can understand why so many people relate to this book. It communicates, in the clearest, simplest language, the hurt that comes from trying to express your inner most feelings and fears to someone incapable of ever really understanding your position. Anyone who has ever tried to tell someone they loved that something was trying to overwhelm them only to be given stupid, pointless advice (You should try to go to bed earlier) will relate. However, the prose itself was too rushed, too childish for me to really love.

But thinking of her life and the idiotic things that were done to her in the attempt to cure her of her disease does make me wonder just what I’m doing wrong now. That is to say, I believe that every decision I make when it comes to my own patients is correct. And, at the risk of sounding arrogant, I believe them (all)(most) to be. But I’m basing both these decisions and my belief in them off of fallible facts. If my facts are wrong, then so am I.

Hmmm, I’m not explaining this well. But as simply as I can put something I don’t really understand myself: The Bell Jar makes me wonder that if what I do, even if it is in the very best intentions and based on the very best known information, is wrong, then can (should) I still consider myself libel (that is, when I later discover the mistake)? I just don’t know.

Moving on before I bog down in what-ifs…


The Sound and the Fury:
If you love gossip, then this is the book. That’s all it is. Well written, well told gossip about the people who used to be the haves but who have since woken up to realize that they are now the have-nots. Its what you used to catch your grandmother and great aunt whispering about over mid-morning coffee, and, for those who were continuously frustrated by the way they always seemed to notice you hiding just below the stairs and thus, not-so-discreetly changed the subject, you finally get the rest of the story. It’s set in the southern US but I think the theme is decidedly cross-cultural.


A Clockwork Orange:
Okay. If you want to read this book, buy the copy ISBN # 0-393-31283-6 and read first the introduction by the author, then the editor’s note and then the critical accolades on the back. You will howl. Suffice it to say, there are a few differences in opinion regarding the story, its conception and subsequent publication. After you’ve done all that, then read the book; it’s good in its own right. As to the 20 versus 21 chapter debate, I would have ended it at 20, but I enjoyed 21. While it’s a nice idea that even the most vicious of people will one day grow up and make a relatively functional societal drone, I have a hard time buying it as a plausible reality. Sorry, Mr. Burgess. :)


The Invisible Man:
Blah, blah, allegory, blah, blah. A decent spook-tale, a brilliantly designed metaphor, but somehow lacking as just a fun read.


Catcher in the Rye:
My second favorite of the group and another that I would suggest reading if you ever got the chance. I can’t really say why, exactly, it clung to me, but I get the distinct impression that I will be reading it more than twice or thrice over.

Strangely enough, it made me want to re-read A Separate Peace. Phineas, anyone?

---

Right. Now I need more suggestions—new, old, anything really (except cereal boxes—I’ve already read most of them). I don’t know why I’ve had such a bug for reading lately. I’ve always enjoyed it, even arranged my life to allow it, but here recently, it’s just been this heart-sick urge to read as much as I can as soon as I can. Its like there’s some invisible deadline hanging over my head but I cannot figure what it is.



Seme/Uke

Illumi
ILLUMI - Cold, dangerous and initially unemotional,you are certainly one hard catch. With a
cunning surpassed by but a few, you can manipulate semes to think that they control
you, then make them suffer a slow, painful death once you grow tired of their arrogance.
But as surprising as this may sound, it is possible to tame you. A strong and patient seme
can earn your trust, and once you're convinced that he's worthy, your seme will find a loyal,
humble uke who knows his place.


Which Hunter X Hunter Uke Are You?
brought to you by Quizilla


Hmmm...
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